Marshal MacDonald

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Marshal MacDonald
« on: June 20, 2007, 08:51:40 PM »
So I am in the kitchen reading the newspaper while my mother approaches and asks to see it. She needs it to check tonights television schedule for a particular programme, Domhnallaich Na Frainge. So I ask, 'Whats that?'.

So anyway my mother explains that my family, on her side, are direct descendants of Neil MacEachen, the subject of the programme. (My mothers maiden name is McEachen)

Anyways why have I brought this to a Napoleonic forum? Well watching the programme I discovered that MacEachen held the gates at carlisle with Bonnie Prince Charlie before ending up in the French Army, in the Scottish section. An agreement between Britain and France meant that he ended up unemployed with the rest of this section of the army. His son, however, was Marshal MacDonald (MacEachen changed his name when he went to France for reasons unknown) who was a General of Napoleon.

If you are Scottish, or have ever met a Scot, then you will know that we all believe to be connected in some way to the MacDonalds or William Wallace. My Uncle did research this though and found that we are quite directly related to Neil. If you search Marshal MacDonald on wikipedia you get even more details. Thats my own little connection to Napoleon which I never knew about though. Interesting.

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2007, 10:28:12 PM »
cool. my family during the napoleonic wars, were probebly farmers, dirt farmers

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Dhekelian

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2007, 01:52:25 AM »
Minney07 what about the Campbells?

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2007, 10:25:25 PM »
Quote
Minney07 what about the Campbells?

Sorry I dont know an awful lot except I know a few guys called Campbell. What do you mean?

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Dhekelian

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2007, 01:37:30 AM »
I know very little about Scottish History as it doesn't interest me that much but from what little I do know the Campbells are a big family name in Scotland like the McDonald's is although they are not much liked I believe, lol

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2007, 11:50:59 AM »
Campbell is reasonably common name in Scotland, although people called campbell were probably never realted. I think usually people just take the name so get in with other clans, so the campbell clan was probably quite strong. (As far as Scottish clans go, anyway)

It is thought that Bonnie prince Charlie favoured the McDonald clan and thats why Auld Neil changed his name to McDonald. Another theory is the French simply couldn't say "MacEachan". (any French here who could confirm?)


My uncle did all the research probably before I was around. He has it stored somewhere in his house, one day I'll look it out I think.

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Dhekelian

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2007, 09:09:06 PM »
I also think you will find that it was the Campbells that betrayed the Macdonalds to the English. Something like that anyway.

Re: Marshal MacDonald
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2008, 09:47:55 PM »
Hi,

Unfortunately you cannot be a descendant through your mother's side of the family. That's how genes are.
The Macdonalds who are descendants of Neil Macdonald, the father of Mareschal Macdonald were attached to the Macdonald of Clan Ranald at the castle at Peninirin/Howbeg in South Uist. They were the hereditary storytellers to the chief. The stories of Duncan and Neil are recorded extensively in the School of Scottish Studies at Edinburgh University. Duncan and Niel died in the 1960's. There ancestry is traced to the early 16th century. They are my great uncles.
My father was born at Howbeg. We are Macdonalds; though we have blood relatives with the name Maceachan, which is a common surname in Uist.
Storytellers/poets attached to the clan would take on the name of the clan. So it is possible that their name was Maceachan at some time. Apparantly in Skye they were known as Macrory.
Jaque Macdonald's mother was French. He was a hero of the French Revolution and the only one of Bonaparte's generals to be made up to general on the field of battle when he won an outrageous victory by destroying the enemy with an assault that went straight though their central core. He is remembered for being the only general who never betrayed or deserted Bonaparte.
Their has never been animosity in Scotland between people on the basis of their names in the popular Macdonald v Campbell tradition. All animosoty has been based on political/clan hostilities. The Massacre of Glencoe was carried out on the orders of William of Orange who used a group of Campbells to carry out the atrocity on behalf of his government. They were therefore acting as agents of the British army rather than as Campbells. They were treated with great hospitality by MacIan of Glencoe precisely because there was no hostility between Macdonalds and Campbells.